Celebrating Black History Month

Peloton
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Jermonte

What’s your role at Peloton?

I am currently the Field Operations Manager for the San Francisco Market.

What’s the most fulfilling part of your position?

Since I have been given the generous opportunity to help build out both the LA and SF markets, the most fulfilling part of my job is to promote good, deserving young people into management positions and seeing them excel. The second most fulfilling part of my job is the level of service we are able to deliver to our Members on a day to day basis. On days when I help out on the road, it never gets old to see the excitement on the faces of our Members once we walk in their home.

What does Black History Month mean to you?

Black History Month is the time we use to celebrate the many contributions African Americans have made to our country. When I think back to slavery and the 1950’s and 60’s, race relations in our country were at an all-time low. Black people were not given the same opportunity as white people. It took brave people like Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rosa Parks to stand up and lead the charge against inequality. Fast forward to 2018, has our country made progress with regards to race relations? Absolutely! Is there an opportunity for those relations to improve even more? Absolutely! I think the important thing is to keep an honest and open dialogue about the social and political issues that plague our country today and I believe Black History Month helps to do so.

Who would you consider to be the most inspirational figure in black history and why?

This is a tough one for me because I actually have two. I am indebted to all the African Americans who paved the way for me to have the opportunities I have today. There have been so many African Americans in black history that have had a positive influence on me including Maya Angelou, Colin Powell, Michael Jordan, Jackie Robinson, Muhammad Ali, Tupac Shakur, Michelle Obama and a host of others. But the two most influential African Americans for me have been Martin Luther King, Jr. and Barack Obama. I believe they were both tremendous leaders with the ability to inspire and instill hope.

Stephanie

What’s your role at Peloton?

I am the Community Coordinator on the Member Experience team.

What’s the most fulfilling part of your position?

Listening to what our Members are saying is insightful and inspiring to learn why so many people love Peloton. Compiling community feedback for different teams to implement new features has been a great way for me to see how so many teams work together.

Why is Black History Month important to you?

Every month is Black History Month to me, but I do enjoy how people make it a point to bring black voices to the forefront of the conversation in February.

Who’s your favorite instructor and why?

I like Ally’s classes. Once she played Meek Mill’s “Dreams and Nightmares” and I got a personal record and my highest output. I do the best when the music resonates with me.

Tell us about your best day at Peloton.

I think my best day was either when we launched the Tread or our segment on Good Morning America. During both times excitement and good energy filled the air; I was really unsure of what to expect. I liked having the opportunity to experience something innovative and creative with the rest of my team.

Do you feel there is a proportionate representation of minorities within your field and at tech companies in general?

There definitely could be more representation of minorities and people of color at tech companies, specifically in marketing. I know there are efforts to make things more diverse and inclusive, so hopefully, we can see this represented more in the future.

Shakah

What’s your role at Peloton?

I’m currently a Member Support Associate helping our Members with their software and hardware questions. I’ll be starting as a Production Technician soon which I’m really excited about!

Do you feel there is a proportionate representation of minorities within your field and at tech companies in general?

As it pertains to tech companies, people of color are not represented well. Departmentally speaking, certain backgrounds are disproportionately represented and this is especially prominent in coding, customer service roles and executive positions. There isn’t just one company that can fix the problem. The tech industry at large needs to address it and take the steps to improve these issues in order to create any kind of change.

What does Black History Month mean to you?

Black History Month is very important to me. It is great to know that we have a month to solely highlight our history; although, I believe that black history is American history and that it should be treated as such.

Who would you consider to be the most inspirational figure in black history and why?

Truthfully, there are so many to choose from. To choose one as the most inspirational is unfair. Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr., Angela Davis, Josephine Baker, Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, Sojourner Truth, Rosa Parks, Langston Hughes, Thurgood Marshall, Sidney Poitier, Muhammad Ali, Sammy Davis Jr., James Baldwin…the list goes on.

Are there any aspects of your family’s culture that you feel were evident in your upbringing, or that you are particularly fond of?

The idea that you should stand up for what you believe in. Anything that is ethically, morally, or consciously important to you – you shouldn’t shy away from expressing that belief in a professional manner.

Tara

What’s your role at Peloton?

I’m the IT Manager here at Peloton so I’m responsible for making sure our internal infrastructure fully supports our business plan and that we grow in a scalable and secure way.

What’s the most fulfilling part of your position?

I love gaining a deep understanding of different parts of the business so I can understand how best to support them. I enjoy diving deep to identify gaps and overall needs and then stepping back to look at a problem more holistically and identifying how we address the needs.

Do you feel there is a proportionate representation of minorities within your field and at tech companies in general?

No, black women are nearly non-existent, or invisible in my field and grossly underrepresented in tech in general. Representation matters and this is an area in which tech could do a lot better.

Who would you consider to be the most inspirational figure in black history and why?

I can’t say that any single figure is most inspirational. I am inspired by the stories of people whose stories we think we know well – Harry Belafonte, James Baldwin, Ida B Wells. I’m inspired by the unnamed and unacknowledged people who moved history through their everyday work, the Katherine Johnsons of the world.

What does Black History Month mean to you?

Black History is human history. There was a time in our collective consciousness that this fact was forgotten and I think Black History Month is a time to acknowledge that and course correct.

Who’s your favorite instructor and why?

Alex Toussaint! His energy and positivity are infectious. He always motivates and pushes me just when my energy is starting to lag and his playlists are always on point. It also doesn’t hurt that our families both hail from the same country too!

Alex

What’s the most fulfilling part of your position?

The most fulfilling part of my job would have to be the ability to change people’s lives in a positive way. I sincerely care about all my riders and to hear that I’m helping them through a tough time or obstacle in life makes me feel like what I’m doing is working. There is no better feeling than being an instructor at Peloton.

Tell us about your best day at Peloton.

My best day at Peloton would have to be the day I joined. From the moment I came through the doors, I felt extremely welcomed by my co-workers and riders. Peloton felt like home since day one!

What does Black History Month mean to you?

I take Black History Month as a time to reflect and give thanks to the people who paved the way for me so I have to ability to do what I do.

Are there any aspects of your family’s culture that you feel were evident in your upbringing, or that you are particularly fond of?

Without a doubt, my family’s culture was evident in my upbringing. I grew up in a Haitian household where nothing was given to you and everything was earned. My mother and father raised me to grind for everything I want in life and never to expect handouts. They gave me the blueprint to success and I just had to follow it while paving out my own lane and what works for me. Thank you, Mom and Dad, I love you!


Make sure to clip in to our upcoming rides dedicated to Black History Month on Tuesday, February 20th taught by Ally Love at 1:30 PM ET and Alex Toussaint 8:30 PM ET. Count yourself in here.